Blue Apron 16 – Moroccan Root Vegetable Tagine w Almond Couscous & Lemon-Yogurt Sauce

So, if once is an anomaly, twice is a coincidence, and three times is a pattern, then am I beginning to sense a pattern coming on here? Coincidence, at least. Much like the Pork & Hominy Pozole recipe, I had NO idea what to expect going into this. There was a word I couldn’t pronounce in the title and the picture looked orange and kind of pretty, but overall I wasn’t sure how or what this was going to taste like. No expectations whatsoever. It wasn’t until the warm, spicy, nutty aroma from this dish emerged and filled the kitchen, I realized, “oh…shit…this is going to be amazing.”

moragcIn this 40 recipe experiment with Blue Apron we have going on, this one easily established a firm position in the top 5, up there with the Pozole from a couple weeks ago. I still haven’t figured out what exactly Tagine is, but like a ta-genie in a bottle, it made some dinner magic for us tonight. The basic makeup of the stew are 3 root vegetables: sweet potatoes, turnip, and parsnip. I cooked them in a tomato sauce base and seasoned it with Ra’s al Ghul Ras El Hanout – a North African spice blend.

hey, parsnip, might I suggest going out and getting a little sunshine? you're awfully pale for a carrot

hey, parsnip, might I suggest going out and getting a little sunshine? you’re looking awfully pale for a carrot

This recipe was simple in its essence and if I were to recreate it, the only challenge would be to find a source for the spice blend although I am totally game for a trip to Morocco. I wonder if something like this could be worked as a slow cooker recipe? I know Blue Apron sends recipes meant to be 1 hour or under, but some days it’s nice for us to use the crockpot. The couscous cooked up fast, and by fast I mean like 3 minutes. Couscous can be a tasty and filling standalone dish, another option for a healthy lunch. Overall, this dinner created a lot of dirty dishes, but I’ll dock a star for how little time was actually spent mixing and cooking over the stovetop. Once the veggies are plopped in, all you have to do is wait for the tagine to cook itself. 2/3 pan-keke cleanup job.

moraca

there is something oh-so-satisfying about squeezing preserved tomatoes with your bare hands

It would be remiss to forget to mention this was unliked by both children. Sad! I really was hoping they would enjoy this one as much as I did. I think what happened was an error in how I served it to them. I put a dollop of yoghurt sauce separate from the stew on their plate and that totally freaked them out. “Mix yoghurt INTO dinner?! That’s sacrilege!” I wonder if mixing it all together and serving in a soup bowl wouldn’t have wigged them out so much. They only ate the almond couscous.

tagine

BUT WAIT!!

There’s another way to deal with all the poor, delicious leftover root vegetables besides banishing them to a fate known as Tupperware purgatory.

Deep inside a suburban house, barred by the mesh wall trappings of a prison known to some as a “pack n’ play,” exists an untainted new hope; one so pure and innocent, he knows not to scoff at the humble spiced sweet potato, only meant to fill his belly with goodness. Our nearly six-month-old has been showing a great deal of interest in food lately, so I decided it was time to give him a first taste of solids. I pureed one of the sweet potatoes, mixed in some mommy-milk and fed him a couple spoonfuls to see what would happen. My son is going to be a person who will be hard to read emotionally. He gummed the puree for 30 seconds, contemplated what was going on but didn’t show he was upset or start crying or anything. I daresay he liked it and he tried about 2 and a half spoonfuls more. Way to go, buddy! Your first experience with solid foods was quite…well…gourmet.

this stuff you call food...I like it...

this stuff you call food…I like it…

About Helen

Person of interest. Surrogate extraordinaire. Sorry about the mess. View all posts by Helen

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